[Podcast] Workers’ Solidarity and Changing Ideology in Belarus

LeftEast shares this podcast with the permission of its producers from Contrasens.

What is precarity? And how does it adapt to the Eastern European context? In the 11th episode of Contrasens’ podcast, we take a closer look at work and workers. Together with our guest, Volodya Artyukh, who is a Ph.D researcher at C.E.U., we talk about labor aspects in the Eastern European space, specifically in Belarus. Our focus is on workers’ solidarity and protests in the context of ideological change in an ex-soviet country. By thinking through the historical context we show you a glimpse of the economical and political characteristics of this space which isn’t known enough.

References: Artyukh Volodymyr’s dissertation: “Betrayed Hopes of Prosperity, Broken Promises of Solidarity: Workers’ Protest at ‘Hranit’ Plan.”
Books mentioned: Chris Miller, The Struggle to Save the Soviet Economy: Mikhail Gorbachev and the Collapse of the USSR
Karl Polanyi, The Great Trasformation: The Political and Economic Origins of our time

Producers: Pati Murg and Vlad Bejinariu
Sponsor and support by: Faculty of Sociology and Social Work, Babeș-Bolyai University
Studio: Radio Romania Cluj (with many thanks to Doina Borgovan)
Mix & master, soundtrack: KindStudios
Visuals: Pati Murg & Maria Martelli

Contrasens is a group of current and past students in sociology and anthropology at Babes Bolyai University in Cluj, Romania, who have got many questions about this world. Some have answers. We want to share them with you, thus we produce episodes in which we discuss current issues with experts in their fields.”

 

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