Tag Archives: Syriza

On the Macedonian question: Statement from DEA and the Red Network

Concerning the recent developments in the Balkans, DEA and the Red Network state the following: The background to understand recent events is the initiative of USA-NATO and the EU to impose a new “stability” and control to the region, by establishing an immediate connection of all the countries with the major imperialist organizations. The timeframe that has already been announced (the EU Summit in Sofia at the end of May and the NATO Summit at the end of June) highlights that they are moving in a fast pace to address the difficulties that Western imperialism is facing in the Middle East, and the turn of Turk ..

Leo Fischer: Corbyn- a major boost to the international Left?

Even if Corbyn does not become British PM tomorrow, his performance will certainly be a major boost to an international Left, which finds itself completely demoralized in a world descending into barbarism. I don´t harbour any illusions on what Corbyn can achieve as PM or even within a Labour Party apparatus largely hostile to his agenda. But the one thing that I am grateful for, is the fact that an outsider, a long-standing campaigner on numerous social isssues, and a man of principles with no previous record of political vanity can – despite having all odds against him – reach out to millions. If th ..

Pavle Ilic: The Labour Campaign- A Sign of Times To Come?

I’m pretty much sure that all of the people from the UK on my friends’ list will cast their vote for Jeremy Corbyn and the Labour party today at the UK GE2017, so this is not really a call to action directed at them. However, I would like to write a couple of words about the implications of the direct correlation between the Labour election result and the development of the left continent-wide (perhaps even wider): The all-wise self-fulfilling-prophecy-making philistines of the left shared a crucial bit of political analysis with the EU ruling elites, i. e. they both viewed Syriza as a doomed-to-begi ..

Andreas Karitzis: The Left in power. What can we learn from the case of SYRIZA? (Part II)

Note from the LeftEast editors: In this long interview with George Souvlis, Andreas Karitzis reflects on his experience as part of the Syriza leadership during the crucial years 2012-2015, on its underpreparedness for the historic project it embarked on, on the odds stacked against it, and on the configurations of power in today’s world. While Syriza’s fight for a fair deal for Greece and a socially just Europe has suffered (a temporary or permanent–we don’t know) defeat, Karizis’s reflections need to be heeded next time the Left comes to power. Part I is available here. ̵ ..

The pain goes on: Greece and the European Union (EU)

As the UK’s referendum on the European Union approaches, Greek workers are facing more pain from Greece’s European creditors The Eurozone last week pushed Greece to accept more austerity in exchange for a loan of 7.5 billion euros to pay off the country’s debt. This comes less than a year after Greece was promised debt relief following a bailout worth 86 billion euros last summer. No debt relief deal is in sight, however. Even the IMF, normally a keen proponent of balanced budgets, argued austerity was only making matters worse in Greece. But the Eurozone, led by Germany and the Netherlands, rejected an ..

Post-Capitulation Greece: Interview with Stathis Kouvelakis

While at the Marx Is Muss 2016 conference earlier this month, Anja Ilic and Pavle Ilic (Marx21) interviewed Stathis Kouvelakis, a member of a party called Popular Unity, which split from Syriza last summer after the referendum. Kouvelakis served at Syriza’s central committee from 2012 to August 2015 and is also a professor of political theory at King’s College in London. This conversation focuses on the political and social situation in Greece today. I would like to start by asking you to summarise the political and social development of the Greek society after the events of August 2015, after the capitulat ..

Greece: first thoughts on the electoral outcome

Note from the LeftEast editors: we post this comment written by an author with pseudonym Quincey, first published on AnalyzeGreece. We are looking for more analyses and reactions on the electoral results in Greece in the following week, so if you have authored anything or are planning to do so, consider submitting it to lefteasteditors [at] gmail.com Some first thoughts on the electoral outcome: 1. First and foremost, it is a triumph of Tsipras. Not of SYRIZA. Tsipras’ party is a shadow of its previous self. Tsipras, despite that he had no party mechanism to assist him, no real narrative to sell, waged a t ..

VIDEO: #TalkReal in Athens

Note from the LeftEast editors: This is the first English episode of #TalkReal, a show that aims to explore the current possibilities and challenges before the left-wing movements in crisis-ridden Europe. LeftEast is happy to join in the media platforms which will be sharing the clips, including so far OpenDemocracy and ROARmag. After months of negotiations Greece reached a bad agreement with its Eurozone partners. The question “What comes next?” was widely discussed at the GCAS World Conference Democracy Rising in Athens (16-19 July), in which the interviewees of #TalkReal took part. As Markos Vo ..

PLAN C: Which plan for the Left government in Greece after the new memorandum?

Over the last couple of days, the Global Centre of Advanced Studies (GCAS) “Democracy Rising” Conference took place in Athens, Greece. There has been much talk about three possible plans for the future of Greece: PLAN A (the continuation of Memoranda politics), PLAN B (exit from Euro), PLAN C (strengthening local cooperatives and subsistence economies, empowering communities). It has to be clear that these plans are not mutually exclusive, but could form at least demarcatory grounds for future strategy and popular mobilisation. This is a short comment on these plans. PLAN A Let me be clear from the st ..

Greece inspires us, but it cannot save us

It continues to be extremely important for people in the rest of Europe to support Greece. Not only for the sake of the Greeks, but for the sense of the future of democracy in Europe, and for the possibility of a break with neoliberalism. Yet there’s a risk of developing the political and analytical blindness of the spectator, when you focus all your attention on the centre of action. Because the story is told of us. No, I don’t mean that in the banal sense, where “we” are responsible, because “our” institutions are doing something bad to Greece. Sure, that’s true in some ..