Tag Archives: Croatia

Breaking the Camel’s Back: When an Earthquake and a Pandemic Converge

Thus, we have to organise and politicise. If anything, the current crisis has demonstrated that the capitalist economy, despite all its hubris over the last couple of decades, is embedded and subordinate to society and not vice-versa. The next crisis will, there’s no doubt about it, demonstrate that the society is embedded and subordinate to nature and not vice-versa. Continue reading →

We Asked on the Legacy of Corbynism: Tomislav Medak

What has the Corbyn project meant – as a model, an inspiration, or otherwise – to you and people in the milieu(x) in which you organise? My political milieu is largely defined by anti-enclosures struggles and a group of progressive and radical left political initiatives in Croatia, which have emerged out of the university occupations and Right to the City movement and have recently started to contest elections. The attraction of the Corbyn project for that milieu would be primarily in the attempt to bootstrap a transformative political project built on a mass political mobilisation under the historica ..

We Asked: the Legacy of Corbynism

Under the radical leadership of Jeremy Corbyn, the UK Labour Party has been seen as a ray of hope and a model for progressive revival by many – though by no means all – leftists across Europe and the Atlantic world. Labour’s painful defeat in the recent general election is an occasion for thinking about the legacy of Corbynism, and the view from Eastern Europe, broadly defined (here including Israel and the diaspora) is particularly important given the role played by Eastern European migration, English nationalism, xenophobia and accusations of antisemitism in the run-up to this decisive setback ..

Croatia’s position on Venezuela: A Perspective from the Left

1.Has Croatia’s government country taken an official position regarding the situation in Venezuela? If yes, what is the position? The government of Croatia has already moved to recognize Guaido as “interim president” about a week ago, when a handful of regional right-wing governments and a handful of imperialist Western countries did so, proving yet again Croatia’s spotless record in neo-colonial bootlickery. 2. What does this (fail to) reveal about the foreign policy/international standing of your country? Like i said, it proves first and foremost that Croatia has no “foreign policy ..

Ankica Čakardić: We need to look for origins of fascism in capitalist crises

Note from the LeftEast editors: This interview with Ankica Čakardić was conducted by Darko Vujica and published at Prometej.Ba in BCS. It is hereby reprinted by LeftEast with the permission of Ankica Čakardić, and translated by Stevan Bozanich. Ankica Čakardić is an assistant professor and the chair of Social Philosophy and Philosophy of Gender at the Faculty for Humanities and Social Sciences, University of Zagreb. Her research interest include Social Philosophy, Marxism, Marxist-feminist and Luxemburgian critique of political economy, and history of women’s struggles in Yugoslavia. She is a member of ..

Agrokor – oligarchic crisis in Croatia

Note from the LeftEast editors: this article was originally published in Slovak in the newspaper Pravda. We republish the piece in English with the kind permission of the author. The blue sea and summer holidays – that is what people usually associate with Croatia. However, there is a vast inland too. And tourism is not the only pillar of the economy though it is crucial as a foreign exchange earner. Since independence, the economy has, however, become more reliant on the tourist sector. Industry suffered heavily from the disintegration of Yugoslavia, the war and transformation. It has never again reached its 1 ..

Electoral Advance For The Radical Left in Croatia

Local elections were held in Croatia on May 21st. This was the first time since the 1990 that the radical left has made significant gains, which is especially encouraging in light of the probable parliamentary snap elections in September. In the capital of Zagreb, the wide left front (consisting of five, mostly new or newish, parties – ranging from left liberals to anti-capitalists) got 7,64% in the elections for the city council (around 24.000 votes). In lower levels of local government, the left front “Zagreb je nas” had even better results – close to 30% in some cases. The explicitly an ..

Bosnia: A very European division

The following article was first published at the online Serbo-Croatian platform Bilten. On 30 January the future organization of Bosnia and Herzegovina, one of the countries of the region without even a formal full sovereignty, was discussed in the foreign affairs committee of the European Parliament (EP), a body in which no representatives of the country concerned have the right to participate. This is, of course, a standard procedure: despite having no plans in the near future to admit Bosnia and Herzegovina as members, the European Union in its significant and less significant bodies regularly assesses the  ..

Against Clerico-Conservative Counter-Revolution and Academic Careerists

“Vlatko Previšić will go down in history as the worst and the most despised Dean ever! – The dean will fall! – Rector Boras is a disgrace!” are just some of the statements made by students at the University of Zagreb in the course of the past few weeks. During this time an extremely serious situation has been unfolding at the Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences (Croatian acronym – FFZG). Among the biggest faculties in Zagreb consisted of 23 separate departments and serving more than 6000 students. The situation escalated when the Dean hired a private security company to use as his own pr ..

Bridging the Gap Between Technocracy and Fascism in Croatia

The Croatian political scene has been very lively since the last parliamentary elections held on 8th November 2015. The results of the election left both major centrist parties unable to form a majority government as the nominally left-of-centre coalition led by the Social Democratic Party (SDP) won 56 seats, while the nominally right-of-centre coalition led by the Croatian Democratic Union (CDU) won 59 seats in a 151-seat parliament. The biggest winner of the election was a new party called Bridge (“Most” in Croatian), which won 19 seats and was thus the decisive factor in the formation of the new government ..